ALDOUS HUXLEY AS PORTAS DO PERCEPO PDF

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ALDOUS HUXLEY AS PORTAS DO PERCEPO PDF

The Doors of Perception & Heaven and Hell has ratings and reviews . As only he can, Aldous Huxley explores the mind’s remote frontiers and the Este livro é composto por duas obras de Aldous Huxley: “As portas da. Aldous Huxley quote: “Facts do not cease to exist because they are when they are and in between are the doors of perception” -Aldous Huxley. As portas da percepção. Aldous Huxley Aldous Huxley took some mescaline and wrote about it some 10 or 12 years earlier than those others. The book he . He did it with his own doors of perception, and excellent philosophical mindset.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. As only he can, Aldous Huxley explores the mind’s remote frontiers and the unmapped areas of human consciousness.

These two astounding essays are among the most profound studies of the effects of mind-expanding drugs written in this century. Contains the complete texts of The Doors of Perception and Heaven and Hellboth of which became essential for the counterculture As only he can, Aldous Ws explores the mind’s remote frontiers and the unmapped areas of human consciousness.

Contains the complete texts of The Doors of Perception and Heaven and Hellboth of which became essential for the counterculture during the s and influenced a generation’s perception of life. Paperbackpages. To see what your friends percpo of this book, please sign up. This question contains spoilers… view spoiler [Its best book I ever read on psychedelic?

The Doors of Perception – Wikipedia

Lists with This Book. Men go abroad to admire the heights of mountains, the mighty billows of the sea, the broad tides of rivers, the compass of the ocean, and the circuits of the stars, and pass themselves by. Augustine, from Confessions If you are like me, you have some reservations about trying drugs — even psychedelic ones. I know one of the people that I look up to — Carl Sagan — was a fairly regular marijuana smoker. I know Richard Feynman, another one of my ‘heroes’, tried some drugs, but stopped at som Men go abroad to admire the heights of mountains, the mighty billows of the sea, the broad tides of rivers, the compass of the ocean, and the circuits of the stars, and pass themselves by.

I know Richard Feynman, another one of my ‘heroes’, tried some drugs, but stopped at some point as he grew afraid of damaging his brain somehow and losing his abilities in mathematics and physics. But the allure is there. Like Ishmael in Moby Dick I have an “everlasting itch for things remote”, but for me it’s not remote, but rather quite the opposite: It’s an enticing idea, you must admit: I can’t help but think that it would be a mistake never to have such an experience during this very short and most likely only experience of consciousness I’ll have.

Huxley, in his Doors of Perception essay doesn’t make it seem like any less of a mistake. Early in MayAldous Huxley volunteered to trip on mescaline in the name of science. The Doors of Perception consists, in its first part, of Huxley recounting his experiences on the drug, and in its second, shorter half of an argument for the usage of psychedelic drugs in order to “ooze past the reducing valve of brain and ego, into consciousness.

There is in particular one remarkably cool idea brought up, quoting the philosopher C. Broad, “that we should do well to consider much more seriously than we have hitherto been inclined to do the type of theory which [Henri] Bergson put forward in connection with memory and sense perception.

The suggestion is that the function of the brain and nervous system and sense organs is in the main eliminative and not productive. Each person is at each moment capable of remembering all that has ever happened to him and of perceiving everything that is happening everywhere in the universe. The function of the brain and the nervous system is to protect us from being overwhelmed and confused by this mass of largely useless and irrelevant knowledge, by shutting out most of what we should otherwise perceive or remember at any moment, and leaving only very small and special selection which is likely to be practically useful.

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However, with drugs, you can let some more consciousness seep through the no longer watertight valve of the brain and nervous system. It is then that there is an “obscure knowledge that All is in all — that All is actually each. I’ll skip writing anything about Heaven and Hellas, honestly, I found it to be pretty boring.

Aldous Huxley

But read The Doors of Perception. View all 9 comments. Nov 02, Frona rated it liked it. Based on his own experience with mescalin, Huxley informs us about the true nature of reality, that is, the sheer scope of it.

He doesn’t stop at great works of art, shizophrenia or religion, but freely connects his aa of this drug to an ambitious bundle of themes in order to supplement them all and to prescribe some more of the same, or at least similar, medicine. The description of his adventure would be much more revealing, if it hadn’t elevate into a lecture about two ancient categories of being, one experienced through our everyday life, where language represents a barrier between us and the world, and the other one of true essence that can be reached only through some transcendental activity such as taking drugs.

Although his expedition to the sphere of pure perception shows him the limitations of words and all of our classifications, it seems he identifies his trip with as ass concepts and theories as he possibly can.

He makes a paradigm of pure being out of it, which selfless as it is, is based on one sole experiment of his humble self. Little is left of this experiment but widespread doctrines, which just fit too neatly. I wonder how much previous knowledge affected his experience or how much posterior interpretations transversed it and I got the feeling he didn’t quite catch its uniqness, or as he would said, suchness.

Or perhaps it was just his forceful implications I have troubles with. When he doesn’t generalize, he does his best; his charachterisation of draperies in the baroque paintings is just beautiful.

This book consists of two essays by Aldous Huxley. The main one is Huxley’s description about his Mescaline trip and his reaction to various forms of pictures paintings while he is on Peyote.

Interesting counterculture book that I can see the aspect of why it was a popular book in the s. This book contained two essays Huxley wrote about the experience of taking Mescalin LSD and his journey to understand his inner self.

I only read the first essay The Doors of Perception and to be honest I found it to be pretty boring. Huxley talks about watching flowers in a vase for hours, or studying old paintings in a new light. He does however make a few interesting concluding remarks, including my favourite quote from the essay: But neither, if we are to remain sane, can we possibly do without direct perception, the more unsystematic the better, of the inner and outer worlds into which we have all been born.

Jul 15, Adam rated it liked it Shelves: I liked this much more when I read it a few years ago. Both positions reflect, I think, biases brought to the reading of the essays. The latter species of reactionary d without much consideration the possibility that certain chemical I liked this much more when I read it a few years ago.

Aldous Huxley – Wikipedia

The latter species of reactionary dismisses without much consideration the possibility that certain chemical substances might be useful and even important one reviewer here compares the experience of reading Huxley’s sober account of his experience with huxlry to the experience of being sober in a car full of drunks.

Another problem with this general account of things, which usually makes the “lol he’s chemically altered he’s lost touch with porrtas appeal, is portaw it fails to take account of how we are all a bundle of chemicals constantly being altered by our experience of the world, the food we eat, the air we breathe, the exercise we get or don’t, etc.

The former species of reactionary probably read on some website that members porgas the Native American Church take peyote, and somehow believes it logical to transition from that assertion to the conclusion that mescaline has some inherent profundity. This type of person reads The Doors of Perception and goes: Huxley’s actually not representative of either of these species, which unfortunately tend to dominate the discussion on synthetic, semi-synthetic, or hucley occurring substances in relation to the human brain.

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That’s not to say he doesn’t perrcepo a lot wrong and that there aren’t problems with his argument in these essays.

I would not present Huxley to anyone as a particularly good philosopher. I should also note that my present reading of Huxley’s position probably has to do with my just having read his The Perennial Philosophywhich outlines his position on mysticism.

Huxley has a point and he has a case. Sharp prose and a dry sense of humour give the essays a bit of an edge over most things of this kind, and Huxley’s Oxford education and midth-century-Englishmanness make the thing quite dramatically unlike most similar things in the drug-lit canon.

Maybe DeQuincey, except DeQuincey’s just way more interesting [despite writing on a seemingly less interesting drug] and has a much more sophisticated account of what constitutes at least reality-for-the-individual attained through sensory and perceptive and cognitive faculties. His position on altered states of consciousness also appears to be quite different than Huxley’s. But that is something not to be commented on at just this moment. If hallucinogens have any utility, then at least some of it surely stems from their capacity to shake up our belief systems, to present reality in a strange, new way—in short, to unlock the doors of our perception.

Yet if this is so, why do so many hallucinogenically-minded writers see: Huxley, Castanedaet. The Doors of Perception is admittedly one of the better works in the drug-lit cano If hallucinogens have any utility, then at least some of it surely stems from their capacity to shake up our belief systems, to present reality in a strange, new way—in short, to unlock the doors of our perception.

The Doors of Perception is admittedly one of the better works in the drug-lit canon. But even still, Huxley often falls back on the familiar “two worlds” trope. As he explains it, psychotropic vehicles like mescalin and LSD grant us access to “the other world,” they transport us to “the antipodes of the mind.

Every mescalin experience, every vision arising under hypnosis, is unique; but all recognizably belong to the same species. The landscapes, the architectures, the clustering gems, the brilliant and intricate patterns—these, in their atmosphere of preternatural light, preternatural color and preternatural significance, are the stuff of which the mind’s antipodes are made.

This isn’t problematic in itself. But Huxley also takes an almost Platonic stance regarding the ordinary and alternate worlds, with the first construed as a muted, pragmatic shadow of the second. As a result, he is led in one lengthy section to condemn all art as essentially a failure. And as Huxley successfully argues, hallucinogenics offer us one way of unlocking its inherent strangeness.

The Doors of Perception & Heaven and Hell

In one especially sage passage, he notes that the most profound dl of mescaline were for him objective in nature: The other world to which mescalin admitted me was not the world of visions; it existed out there, in what I could see with my eyes open. The great change was in the realm of objective fact.

What had happened to my subjective universe was relatively unimportant. Yet when presented with conflicting views of reality, we can respond in one of two ways. First, we can accept that both—or neither—has a claim to “the truth. Or second, we could believe that the strange, new one supersedes the old. Such is the way of dogma.

For all his insight and erudition, Huxley takes the second path. View all 3 comments. Jan ro, Hadrian rated it liked it Shelves: Huxley’s eloquent little essay is the precursor to the modern position on drug use – resentment that tobacco and alcohol, which are plainly harmful, are legal, and yet other illegal drugs, which are ambiguous, are not.

Such drugs, as unknown as they are to those in policy, need more scientific analysis. Huxley’s own personal experience, his own data point is well-written, but we need more.