KARABEL THE CHOSEN PDF

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KARABEL THE CHOSEN PDF

In The Chosen, the Berkeley sociologist Jerome Karabel lifts the veil on a century of admission and exclusion at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton. How did the. In The Chosen, the Berkeley sociologist Jerome Karabel lifts the veil on a Many of Karabel’s findings are astonishing: the admission of blacks into the Ivy. THE CHOSEN. The Hidden History of Admission and. Exclusion at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton. By Jerome Karabel. Illustrated. pp.

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Return to Book Page. Preview — The Chosen by Jerome Karabel. A landmark work of social and cultural history, The Chosen vividly reveals the changing dynamics of power and privilege in America over the past century.

Full of colorful characters including Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, James Bryant Conant, and Kingman Brewsterit shows how the ferocious battles over admissions at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton shaped the A A landmark work of social and cultural history, The Chosen vividly reveals the changing dynamics of power and privilege in America over the past century.

Full of colorful characters including Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, James Bryant Conant, and Kingman Brewsterit shows how the ferocious battles over admissions at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton shaped the American elite and bequeathed to us the peculiar system of college admissions that we have today.

No one who reads this remarkable book will ever think about college admissions — or America — in the same way again. Paperbackcjosen. Published September 8th by Mariner Books first published October 26th To see what your friends thought of this book, karahel sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Chosenplease sign up. Lists with This Book. Race being the great American obsession and often confused with religion being Jewish can be a minus point as they are over-represented according to some recru “It is no exaggeration to say that the current regime in elite college admissions has been far more successful in democratizing anxiety than opportunity.

The Chosen: The Hidden History of Admission and Exclusion at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton

Race being the great American obsession and often confused with religion being Jewish can be a minus point as they are over-represented according to some recruiters, this also is beginning to apply to Asians especially those whose family hailed from the Indian subcontinent. It’s easier if you are from a really poor and so can be the karaabel of a major scholarship, ethnic and karaebl, or are a top notch athlete as all these groups contribute to the ‘scores’ of the universities in being good, all-round representative places.

Even if they aren’t really. It’s easier still if you are Choseen American or are of other under-represented ethnic minorities even if you don’t meet the academic standard. The is positive action. Maybe it will work, or maybe given the rigorous academic standards of the Ivy League schools, they will just fail to keep up. The universities do not have to publicise figures of drop-outs and the areas of society they came from. If you happen to be at least part Carib Indian, brought up in the islands, a pretty damn good athlete and have American nationality by accident of birth, and even dyslexic adds points!

So my Scottish friend’s daughter has her pick of the big three when when she graduates from school. But she wants to go to Aberystwyth, in Wales, because her girlfriend is there. Will head win over heart? I doubt it, whose does at 18? No system is free of bias and without doubt these cjosen deliberately select for rich white kids, especially the children or relatives of alumni, politicians and notables and the very wealthy who might endow, donate or leave money in a will to them.

A customer of mine is the granddaughter of one of the richest women in the world she lives locally. She left school at 15 to pursue a career in riding, but that failed and now at 18 she wants to be a vet. She says her problem is that she wouldn’t ever be able to do the exams but is ok at assignments and essays. I asked her how she would get into a university and she waved her hand at me vaguely, oh grandma would fix things, maybe give a library or something she joked, being quite self-aware.

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THE CHOSEN by Jerome Karabel | Kirkus Reviews

I hear she cbosen in Glasgow university a couple of weeks ago. But at least they have sizeable minorities of kids from normal backgrounds these days. Maybe one day selection will karxbel done by computers on grades and various other attributes like social contributions, athleticism, talents and ambitions and have nothing whatsoever to do with the parents’ background whether ethnic, religious or economic.

One can but hope. After all, who knows where the next great genius or inventor or person that inspires us all will come from? Everyone deserves a chance.

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Apr 17, Kyle rated it liked it. Elite colleges are no different than any other status seeking organization. Their explicit goal is to select the future political, social and economic leaders of the U. The author reveals that this is accomplished by utilizing a definition of “merit” that has evolve Elite colleges are no different than any other status seeking organization.

Jerome Karabel – Wikipedia

The author reveals that this is accomplished by utilizing a definition of “merit” that has evolved to consider things like specific personality traits, legacy status, race and athletic ability pretty much equally as important as one’s academic profile. The book was not very exciting and quite repetitive, but in retrospect very enlightening.

It’s one of those works that unveil an institution heavily shrouded in prestige so that you can see how things really work. It probably could have been done in half the length though. Nov 26, Carl added it Shelves: One of the best sources of cocktail-party conversation you may ever encounter assuming that your fellow partygoers are interested in college, social class, history, sociology, racism or anti-Semitism or sexism, or the American ideal of meritocracythis long, long book is entirely worth the effort.

Some key moments, in a litany of fascinating and often horrifying ones: The Princeton Director of Admissions in pulled an African-American kid out of the registration line to tell him One of the best sources of cocktail-party conversation you may ever encounter assuming that your fellow partygoers are interested in college, social class, history, sociology, racism or anti-Semitism or sexism, or the American ideal of meritocracy oarabel, this long, long book is entirely worth the effort.

The Princeton Director of Admissions in pulled an African-American kid out of the registration line to tell him not to enroll, for his own good so argued the director, insisting that he was not racist With that “accidentally admitted” African-American successfully excluded, Princeton continued its lily-white run: All of NY’s, Chicago’s, and Philadelphia’s public schools together sent a total of 13 students to Yale inwhile the exclusive private school St.

Paul’s sent 24 that year The massive and excellent Bronx High School of Science enrolled 7 of its grads at Yale during the choeen Under President Lowell in particular, Harvard was so confident in their presumption that it was appropriate to limit the number of Jews that Lowell presented his quota ideas more chhosen less publically.

Yale and Princeton were more circumspect, and ended up limiting the number of Jews more successfully, lacking a backlash, but even Lowell was able to cut the percentage of Jews almost in half from to Admissions men and administrators tended to use the word “neurotic” or “disgruntled” as code to describe the Jewish student. It’s a story of prejudice, anti-intellectualism, clubbishness, and unacknowledged privilege — or rather, privilege disguised as divine right instead of perceived properly as the result of systemic bias.

And yet Karabel sources so thoroughly the hundred pages of end-notes are also full of gems and covers his topics so broadly and with such academic rigor, this never comes off yhe polemical. Yes, I’m cjosen Harvard grad, and one who believes that legacies and athletes receive much more advantage in admissions than they should — sorry, My Two Children — and I loved seeing the embarrassing secrets topple out of the secret files. It’s more properly a story about America, and how we as a nation love our self-mythologization even as we te blind to the fictional and hypocritical elements of it.

The colleges’ tasks were and are hard, and the stakes were and are high in both practical and symbolic ways; it is Karabel’s greatest success that we readers don’t despise these schools overall, despite their many crimes against equality, liberty, and fraternity Not far off as a concept, though.

Especially rich topics that the sociologist author mines expertly include the development of co-education in the late ’60s and early ’70s, the conversion of affirmative action from a set of policies that favored legacies and private school boys to those that favored historically-underrepresented minorities over a very brief and tumultuous period, the quest for “yield”, and the power of alumni.

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Some of the little moments dinged around in my head for a long time: Perhaps most prominent among Karabel’s theses is the surprising one that “merit”, that term so blithely bandied about nowadays by conservative critics of affirmative action, was initially instituted as the non-academic “diversity criteria” that favored legacies who had private school pedigrees. Diversity was what legacies contributed!

Knock me over with a feather. Harvard and Yale had similar admission percentages. Membership has its privileges. At least his writing is clear. Karabel is a professor at Cal-Berkeley. A third thing, which I can gloss over more easily, was the amount of repetition. Many statistics, quotations, and other references were repeated several times — almost as if it were a hedge against the likelihood that readers would dive into only one segment of the book, and leave the rest untouched. It can be overwhelming, true.

But there’s a bigger structural issue here as well: As I say, I can gloss this because I like the persistence in giving all Three their fair share of attention, but it did karabek irritating at times. Any quibble I have with Karabel’s style or structure or editing is dwarfed by the irritation engendered by the practices revealed in this mesmerizing history. And yet, it is chsoen that his non-polemical, thoroughly academic approach recognizes when they mean well and yet are overwhelmed by realpolitik.

If we laypeople look at college admissions karxbel and smirk, “If only they listened to me, this could be easily fixed,” we’re being wildly naive. The task is both crucial and excruciatingly difficult, in ways that Karabel’s readers choosen much, much more thoroughly appreciate.

Feb 02, Jackie rated it really liked it. My spouse finally finished reading aloud this epic examination of the admissions policies and practices of the top three Ivies during the past century. A fascinating and appalling examination of how the anti-semitism of the administrations of each college shaped many of the admissions policies we take for granted today too many smart Jewish boys were applying in the early decades of the century; to keep their numbers down, the colleges started adding interviews, SAT scores, extracurricular larabel My spouse finally finished reading aloud this epic examination of the admissions policies and practices of the top three Ivies during the past century.

A fascinating and appalling examination of how the anti-semitism of the administrations of each college shaped many of the admissions policies we take for granted today too many smart Jewish boys were applying in the early decades of the century; to keep their numbers down, the colleges started adding interviews, SAT scores, extracurricular activities, and recommendation letters to the admissions mix. Heartening, though, to read about the movements in the 60s and 70s to protest racial exclusions esp.

Although disheartening to see how pushback from alumni in the 80s and 90s undercut many of the more radical changes of mid-century.

The final chapter was particularly interesting; I didn’t know that the man who coined the term “meritocracy” thought of it as a dystopian rather than a liberating construct, in large part because those at the top of the privilege heap get to define what “merit” is. Merit currently includes not only academic achievement, but being a child of an alum; having athletic abilities choxen have little to do with academic potential; and, karabep a long and difficult struggle, being a member of an American racial minority.

As the author notes, working class kids are the ones who are currently the least likely to benefit from the current admissions system. But anyone interested about race, class, and “merit” play into the admissions game should find this worth the slog or should check out the recent New Yorker article that summarizes many of Karabel’s findings.

Jan 06, Tressie Mcphd rated it really liked it. Meticulous historical account of how exclusive Universities developed discretionary admissions policies to, first, restrict the merit-based entry of ethnic Jews.

They discovered that this discretionary power suited the needs of the administrators.